Since traveling takes me out of my routine, I decided to sign up  for a week of yoga at a studio a few blocks down from where I'm staying  in Brooklyn and hold myself accountable to going everyday.  I  used to think yoga was boring, too slow, and a waste of a good hour  where I could be working out instead of dodging someones foot from  hitting me in the face. I only went a handful of times in NYC, always  leaving with the confirmation that it wasn't for me.  Yesterday  morning though, after 5 days in a row of yoga (and almost a year of  practicing it in LA), I realized how much that perspective has changed.   My  twin brother had just come in the night before and we ended up walking  and talking for hours around Williamsburg, getting late night pizza and  little sleep (this is our idea of a wild night now). When I got to the  class and started to get into it, I could sense how heavy my legs felt  from the walk. I felt the soreness from the 5 days practice prior. I was  tired, didn't drink enough water, and moving much slower than earlier  in the week.  That's the beauty of yoga though. It forces you to  get out of your head and into your body. You start to really listen to  what it's telling you, and stop silencing - or worse; judging it for not  being up to your standards. I admit, I started down that path. But I  caught myself a lot earlier than I used to. I came back to my breath. I  changed my thoughts from what my body was lacking to the fact that I had  the opportunity to attend that class (with my brother on the mat next  to me instead of 3,000 miles away), that my body was doing a lot of  really great things for me, and that I was doing it a service by moving  it that morning.   Yoga can teach us a lot of things, but the  biggest lesson is that getting out of our crazy minds once and awhile  and back into our bodies is one of the greatest things we can do for  ourselves. Even if it means dodging a foot to the face.

Since traveling takes me out of my routine, I decided to sign up for a week of yoga at a studio a few blocks down from where I'm staying in Brooklyn and hold myself accountable to going everyday.

I used to think yoga was boring, too slow, and a waste of a good hour where I could be working out instead of dodging someones foot from hitting me in the face. I only went a handful of times in NYC, always leaving with the confirmation that it wasn't for me.

Yesterday morning though, after 5 days in a row of yoga (and almost a year of practicing it in LA), I realized how much that perspective has changed.

My twin brother had just come in the night before and we ended up walking and talking for hours around Williamsburg, getting late night pizza and little sleep (this is our idea of a wild night now). When I got to the class and started to get into it, I could sense how heavy my legs felt from the walk. I felt the soreness from the 5 days practice prior. I was tired, didn't drink enough water, and moving much slower than earlier in the week.

That's the beauty of yoga though. It forces you to get out of your head and into your body. You start to really listen to what it's telling you, and stop silencing - or worse; judging it for not being up to your standards. I admit, I started down that path. But I caught myself a lot earlier than I used to. I came back to my breath. I changed my thoughts from what my body was lacking to the fact that I had the opportunity to attend that class (with my brother on the mat next to me instead of 3,000 miles away), that my body was doing a lot of really great things for me, and that I was doing it a service by moving it that morning.

Yoga can teach us a lot of things, but the biggest lesson is that getting out of our crazy minds once and awhile and back into our bodies is one of the greatest things we can do for ourselves. Even if it means dodging a foot to the face.

Life by Design was born out of a need for my own self-healing after decades of unresolved illness. It wasn’t until finding the courage to look within that I discovered it was my own belief system holding me back from experiencing a truly thriving life. We all have access to that thriving life. We just need to rediscover our power and ignite the healing-self. Only then can we unapologetically live a life by our own design.