Nicole RaymondiComment

Nicole RaymondiComment
        “Dance is the hidden language of the soul and the body.” - Martha Graham  I  always loved to dance. I staked out my favorite spots in New York with the best music (always hip hop, house gets old real quick) and would  religiously make the voyage there any chance I got, weeknight or  weekend. My girlfriends and I would get dressed up, have a few drinks,  and head out to the dark club for DJ’s and more drinks.  I still  can’t tell if that was a positive thing for my health and well-being or a negative. I’d like to think I broke even with the combination of  little sleep and excessive amounts of alcohol counterbalanced with the  intellectual stimulation of socialization, emotional relief through the  music, and physical stress relief from dancing it all out.   But like all good (or neutral) things, they must come to an end. So when my regular clubbing days were over, I stopped dancing.  Then I moved in with  @jongaymondi   for the last couple years in NYC. Jonathan was always dancing. And  singing. I would make dinner every night and he’d be on dish duty with his headphones in dancing as he scrubbed each one. He’d take showers for  far too long with his music playing while he sang at the top of his  lungs and I banged on the door from the other side for him to hurry up.  And anywhere we went out - dive bar, high end (nicer) bar, or house party - he had no problem being the first, and many times only, one dancing as I watched from the sidelines.  Since then, I’ve taken  a cue from Jonathan. I don’t need a dark club and alcohol in my veins to move my body anymore. I bring my music into the shower with me, I dance naked in front of the mirror while I put my makeup on, I dance while I do my own dishes, and I dance some mornings instead of  stretching or doing yoga.  It’s also a nice little tool to have  anytime you’re feeling down. Even if you don’t feel like it, just throw on some upbeat music, start to move (clothed or unclothed), and watch  how your mentality follows. The best part is; it’s a total win for your health and well-being. It’s no longer neutral territory.

“Dance is the hidden language of the soul and the body.” - Martha Graham

I always loved to dance. I staked out my favorite spots in New York with the best music (always hip hop, house gets old real quick) and would religiously make the voyage there any chance I got, weeknight or weekend. My girlfriends and I would get dressed up, have a few drinks, and head out to the dark club for DJ’s and more drinks.

I still can’t tell if that was a positive thing for my health and well-being or a negative. I’d like to think I broke even with the combination of little sleep and excessive amounts of alcohol counterbalanced with the intellectual stimulation of socialization, emotional relief through the music, and physical stress relief from dancing it all out.

But like all good (or neutral) things, they must come to an end. So when my regular clubbing days were over, I stopped dancing.

Then I moved in with @jongaymondi for the last couple years in NYC. Jonathan was always dancing. And singing. I would make dinner every night and he’d be on dish duty with his headphones in dancing as he scrubbed each one. He’d take showers for far too long with his music playing while he sang at the top of his lungs and I banged on the door from the other side for him to hurry up. And anywhere we went out - dive bar, high end (nicer) bar, or house party - he had no problem being the first, and many times only, one dancing as I watched from the sidelines.

Since then, I’ve taken a cue from Jonathan. I don’t need a dark club and alcohol in my veins to move my body anymore. I bring my music into the shower with me, I dance naked in front of the mirror while I put my makeup on, I dance while I do my own dishes, and I dance some mornings instead of stretching or doing yoga.

It’s also a nice little tool to have anytime you’re feeling down. Even if you don’t feel like it, just throw on some upbeat music, start to move (clothed or unclothed), and watch how your mentality follows. The best part is; it’s a total win for your health and well-being. It’s no longer neutral territory.

Life by Design was born out of a need for my own self-healing after decades of unresolved illness. It wasn’t until finding the courage to look within that I discovered it was my own belief system holding me back from experiencing a truly thriving life. We all have access to that thriving life. We just need to rediscover our power and ignite the healing-self. Only then can we unapologetically live a life by our own design.