Nicole RaymondiComment

Nicole RaymondiComment
        Hiked in Malibu with  @jongaymondi   over the weekend and I posted this quote on one of the scenic photos overlooking the ocean in my stories (week highlights are updated if you  feel so inclined to momentarily escape Monday for Malibu views). It seemed to really resonate with many of you and I got to thinking about it last night.  I remember at my graduation from Syracuse (we  won't mention how long ago that was) Joe Biden was the keynote speaker and gave a really great speech about, well, something I can't remember. Then we had Aaron Sorkin and a few other recognizable speakers but I was too hungover and hungry to pay attention. Until some kid from my class  got up to the podium. I don't remember why he was even up there,  probably graduating with some sort of high honors, but when he started to speak I lit up and leaned in.  His speech was about the power  of play. He started with a definition of play, and I'm paraphrasing, but it was something along the lines of; "To engage in an activity for  enjoyment and recreation rather than a serious or practical purpose." He then talked about how his own success could be contributed to viewing  his work not as an obligation or something of 'serious practical  purpose' but as play. That's where I leaned in. Instead of solely talking about the benefits of play and following your passions, seeing the world in child-like ways, making more time for leisurely activities, all of the things we normally hear attributed to the art of play - he spoke about blurring the lines between work and play.   In our culture, we are supposed to divide work and play. We work to make enough  money (and hopefully have enough time) to make space for having fun in our lives - whether that's pursuing hobbies, spending time with loved ones, or going on vacation. But if we blur those lines, and regard every moment as play, not as an activity that fits into one box or the other, we enter a state of complete presence and flow. Life is no longer a balancing act between both extremes but an enjoyable dance.  I  hope you can take that mindset into your week the same way I was fortunate enough to leave that graduation ceremony and take it out into the world.

Hiked in Malibu with @jongaymondi over the weekend and I posted this quote on one of the scenic photos overlooking the ocean in my stories (week highlights are updated if you feel so inclined to momentarily escape Monday for Malibu views). It seemed to really resonate with many of you and I got to thinking about it last night.

I remember at my graduation from Syracuse (we won't mention how long ago that was) Joe Biden was the keynote speaker and gave a really great speech about, well, something I can't remember. Then we had Aaron Sorkin and a few other recognizable speakers but I was too hungover and hungry to pay attention. Until some kid from my class got up to the podium. I don't remember why he was even up there, probably graduating with some sort of high honors, but when he started to speak I lit up and leaned in.

His speech was about the power of play. He started with a definition of play, and I'm paraphrasing, but it was something along the lines of; "To engage in an activity for enjoyment and recreation rather than a serious or practical purpose." He then talked about how his own success could be contributed to viewing his work not as an obligation or something of 'serious practical purpose' but as play. That's where I leaned in. Instead of solely talking about the benefits of play and following your passions, seeing the world in child-like ways, making more time for leisurely activities, all of the things we normally hear attributed to the art of play - he spoke about blurring the lines between work and play.

In our culture, we are supposed to divide work and play. We work to make enough money (and hopefully have enough time) to make space for having fun in our lives - whether that's pursuing hobbies, spending time with loved ones, or going on vacation. But if we blur those lines, and regard every moment as play, not as an activity that fits into one box or the other, we enter a state of complete presence and flow. Life is no longer a balancing act between both extremes but an enjoyable dance.

I hope you can take that mindset into your week the same way I was fortunate enough to leave that graduation ceremony and take it out into the world.

Life by Design was born out of a need for my own self-healing after decades of unresolved illness. It wasn’t until finding the courage to look within that I discovered it was my own belief system holding me back from experiencing a truly thriving life. We all have access to that thriving life. We just need to rediscover our power and ignite the healing-self. Only then can we unapologetically live a life by our own design.