Nicole RaymondiComment

Nicole RaymondiComment
        Picking up my dad this morning at LAX so in honor of his arrival from the East Coast you know I had to do a Porsche post.  After  I was old enough to get my driver's license my dad did something I'm  not sure many fathers would allow their daughters to do. He let me come  up to the racetrack with him and learn how to race. I didn't realize it  at the time, but those years spent out on the road course and in that  classroom taught me so many valuable life lessons. Especially, at a time  when I wasn't particularly open to learning life lessons. I was more  about experiencing the life lessons and taking little guidance along the  way. Racing allowed me to learn by doing. And feeling.  One of  those lessons that I originally labeled as BS but came around to after  literally coming around in a few full tailspins in my car was that of  preparing for the worst. While I was eagerly learning about racing lines  and car dynamics my dad also emphasized the importance of mentally  rehearsing what I would do in the case of losing control of the car. In  fact, he took it even further and suggested that just the way I  memorized every corner of the track in my mind with my breakpoints,  turn-in, acceleration, and visual markers - I do the same for being out  of control. Recognizing how much runoff space there was (or wasn't) at  each corner and how tight the turn was. I then rehearsed plunging both  of my feet into the brake pedal and clutch at the same time to slow the  car and played a little movie in my mind reminding myself not to  overreact and countersteer into the spin, expediting it, or worse,  jerking the car back onto the pavement causing it to catch traction and  propelling it into the inside of the corner where the guardrails are a  lot less forgiving.  So when I felt my back tires touch off the  road for the first time and my world start to spin; I did exactly that,  just like I'd practiced, and brought the car home without a scratch. My  dad even got a little decal for my back window that said 360 degrees to  make light of the situation.  I think life’s a lot like that.  Knowing what to do in the worst case scenario gives you the confidence  to pursue the best case scenario.

Picking up my dad this morning at LAX so in honor of his arrival from the East Coast you know I had to do a Porsche post.

After I was old enough to get my driver's license my dad did something I'm not sure many fathers would allow their daughters to do. He let me come up to the racetrack with him and learn how to race. I didn't realize it at the time, but those years spent out on the road course and in that classroom taught me so many valuable life lessons. Especially, at a time when I wasn't particularly open to learning life lessons. I was more about experiencing the life lessons and taking little guidance along the way. Racing allowed me to learn by doing. And feeling.

One of those lessons that I originally labeled as BS but came around to after literally coming around in a few full tailspins in my car was that of preparing for the worst. While I was eagerly learning about racing lines and car dynamics my dad also emphasized the importance of mentally rehearsing what I would do in the case of losing control of the car. In fact, he took it even further and suggested that just the way I memorized every corner of the track in my mind with my breakpoints, turn-in, acceleration, and visual markers - I do the same for being out of control. Recognizing how much runoff space there was (or wasn't) at each corner and how tight the turn was. I then rehearsed plunging both of my feet into the brake pedal and clutch at the same time to slow the car and played a little movie in my mind reminding myself not to overreact and countersteer into the spin, expediting it, or worse, jerking the car back onto the pavement causing it to catch traction and propelling it into the inside of the corner where the guardrails are a lot less forgiving.

So when I felt my back tires touch off the road for the first time and my world start to spin; I did exactly that, just like I'd practiced, and brought the car home without a scratch. My dad even got a little decal for my back window that said 360 degrees to make light of the situation.

I think life’s a lot like that. Knowing what to do in the worst case scenario gives you the confidence to pursue the best case scenario.

Life by Design was born out of a need for my own self-healing after decades of unresolved illness. It wasn’t until finding the courage to look within that I discovered it was my own belief system holding me back from experiencing a truly thriving life. We all have access to that thriving life. We just need to rediscover our power and ignite the healing-self. Only then can we unapologetically live a life by our own design.