Nicole RaymondiComment

Nicole RaymondiComment
        When I first started learning how to race, there was only so many hours in the day that could be spent on track time. As a result, my  father, who was my first instructor, encouraged me to sit in silence  when I got home and visualize running my lap at the track. His advice  was to set a timer and run through each turn - seeing the marker I had  chosen as my reminder point to start breaking, feeling the sensations of  the car's weight shift as I pressed on the petals and began to  downshift, the sound of the engine increasing in pressure, and the force  of the car as it moved through the corner and into acceleration. Then  onto the straight, and the next turn, and the turn after that, until I  had run through my whole lap.   That sounded like a huge waste of time to me. Especially because I grew up in an area where any form of  meditation/visualization practice was never even spoke of. But like  most of my teenage years, my curiosity got the best of me and I decided  to try it.   It didn't take long to realize that if I really  stayed with it - took myself out of the shitty desk chair I was sitting  in and into my mind - if I really visualized being at the track, in the  seat of the car with the weight of my helmet on and the sensations  around me, I could just about get my lap time down to the second. When I showed up at the actual track, those times got increasingly better.   That's  when I became aware of the power of visualization. The ability of our mind to take us somewhere we are not - and with that create a better reality.    Recently, I’ve been sitting down again, for about the  same time as a two minute lap but in a less shitty desk chair, and visualizing where I want to be in 3 years. I won’t give away all the  details but mine starts at a dinner in NYC. I vividly see my  surroundings, what I’m wearing, who I’m with, how the food tastes, how it feels to be in that moment - I get as specific as I can and go there  with as much clarity as possible. Even for a couple minutes. So that in 3  years, I can be at that restaurant and not in that desk chair, just  like I envisioned.

When I first started learning how to race, there was only so many hours in the day that could be spent on track time. As a result, my father, who was my first instructor, encouraged me to sit in silence when I got home and visualize running my lap at the track. His advice was to set a timer and run through each turn - seeing the marker I had chosen as my reminder point to start breaking, feeling the sensations of the car's weight shift as I pressed on the petals and began to downshift, the sound of the engine increasing in pressure, and the force of the car as it moved through the corner and into acceleration. Then onto the straight, and the next turn, and the turn after that, until I had run through my whole lap.

That sounded like a huge waste of time to me. Especially because I grew up in an area where any form of meditation/visualization practice was never even spoke of. But like most of my teenage years, my curiosity got the best of me and I decided to try it.

It didn't take long to realize that if I really stayed with it - took myself out of the shitty desk chair I was sitting in and into my mind - if I really visualized being at the track, in the seat of the car with the weight of my helmet on and the sensations around me, I could just about get my lap time down to the second. When I showed up at the actual track, those times got increasingly better.

That's when I became aware of the power of visualization. The ability of our mind to take us somewhere we are not - and with that create a better reality.

Recently, I’ve been sitting down again, for about the same time as a two minute lap but in a less shitty desk chair, and visualizing where I want to be in 3 years. I won’t give away all the details but mine starts at a dinner in NYC. I vividly see my surroundings, what I’m wearing, who I’m with, how the food tastes, how it feels to be in that moment - I get as specific as I can and go there with as much clarity as possible. Even for a couple minutes. So that in 3 years, I can be at that restaurant and not in that desk chair, just like I envisioned.

Life by Design was born out of a need for my own self-healing after decades of unresolved illness. It wasn’t until finding the courage to look within that I discovered it was my own belief system holding me back from experiencing a truly thriving life. We all have access to that thriving life. We just need to rediscover our power and ignite the healing-self. Only then can we unapologetically live a life by our own design.