Throwing it back to my emo quote days but it's something I want to talk about.   Scars,  in our culture - especially for women, have long been perceived as  unattractive and ugly. As a kid, I gained some pretty nasty raised scars  on my knees (a total of 6 - you can see one in my last post) and a  couple on my hands/arms. They're an accumulation of my days building  tree forts and running/biking/doing anything and everything to keep up  with my brothers and the boys next door. When I started school and all  the girls were wearing cute knee length dresses, I resented my scars so  much. I hated the way they looked and most kids, as kids are infamous  for, weren't shy to point them out like, "Ew! What happened?!"   After  those scars faded, I got another shot at having a lovely 2 inch  incision in the middle of my neck during college after having  parathyroid surgery. I remember freaking out about the surgery - and  despite how sick I was at the time - one of my biggest worries was how  hideous that neck scar would be. What would people think? I even adopted  my own version of a Steve Job's uniform for nights out. Skinny jeans,  heels, and a skin tight turtleneck was my go-to. Hot. After those fears  subsided and the scar faded, I had abdominal hernia surgery last year  and woke up with not one, but 2 incisions due to a small complication.   Long  story short, today I'm oddly proud of my scars. Like your clothes,  haircut, makeup, or tattoos - it's a way of saying who you are without  having to speak. I've finally realized it's a show of strength and  character, not weakness and shame. Plus, they can be great conversation  pieces. 🌹🔥   What stories do your scars tell? (I really want to  know, it bothers me when people are like ‘what are your plans this  weekend? Tell me in the comments!’ 😝)

Throwing it back to my emo quote days but it's something I want to talk about.

Scars, in our culture - especially for women, have long been perceived as unattractive and ugly. As a kid, I gained some pretty nasty raised scars on my knees (a total of 6 - you can see one in my last post) and a couple on my hands/arms. They're an accumulation of my days building tree forts and running/biking/doing anything and everything to keep up with my brothers and the boys next door. When I started school and all the girls were wearing cute knee length dresses, I resented my scars so much. I hated the way they looked and most kids, as kids are infamous for, weren't shy to point them out like, "Ew! What happened?!"

After those scars faded, I got another shot at having a lovely 2 inch incision in the middle of my neck during college after having parathyroid surgery. I remember freaking out about the surgery - and despite how sick I was at the time - one of my biggest worries was how hideous that neck scar would be. What would people think? I even adopted my own version of a Steve Job's uniform for nights out. Skinny jeans, heels, and a skin tight turtleneck was my go-to. Hot. After those fears subsided and the scar faded, I had abdominal hernia surgery last year and woke up with not one, but 2 incisions due to a small complication.

Long story short, today I'm oddly proud of my scars. Like your clothes, haircut, makeup, or tattoos - it's a way of saying who you are without having to speak. I've finally realized it's a show of strength and character, not weakness and shame. Plus, they can be great conversation pieces. 🌹🔥

What stories do your scars tell? (I really want to know, it bothers me when people are like ‘what are your plans this weekend? Tell me in the comments!’ 😝)

Life by Design was born out of a need for my own self-healing after decades of unresolved illness. It wasn’t until finding the courage to look within that I discovered it was my own belief system holding me back from experiencing a truly thriving life. We all have access to that thriving life. We just need to rediscover our power and ignite the healing-self. Only then can we unapologetically live a life by our own design.