Nicole RaymondiComment

Nicole RaymondiComment
        Alright, I’ve been eagerly waiting for February to come around, 1 month after all those New Years resolutions, so I could talk about what I’m working on this year and have some experience to back up my new methodology.  Unlike previous years, where my health resolutions usually included cleaning up my diet even further (overdid that one), or starting a new fitness routine, this year I decided to simply maintain my daily movement/whole foods lifestyle and instead focus heavily on the mind.  The interesting part about focusing on the mind is you have to use the mind to improve the mind. So forget mind over matter, it’s mind over mind.  Part of that challenge began with detaching myself just enough to recognize there‘s few minds involved and repeatedly giving the upper hand to the helpful one when the critical one starts its mental slander. I’ll emphasize repeatedly because like anything it’s a practice. In my case, and I suspect I’m not alone, the critical one has been stepping in and talking for most of my life, and it’s not taking a backseat quietly. Especially, when I’ve decided to actively focus my attention on making sure it stays in the backseat.  To lessen the conflict and make this transition a bit smoother, I imagine the critical, fear-based, anxious mind as more of an oversized (cute and lovable) puppy. And in the same way driving around with a puppy that isn’t trained to stay in the backseat while you focus on the road, it will continually try to get your attention and move to the front. As you repeatedly (gently) move it to the back it will whine, tantrum, and try everything - even the endearing gestures - to reclaim its status. But you’re driving now. Thank it for all of the times it’s served you in the past but we’re traveling at different speeds now - and we’re going different places.  Once you ask it to stay in the back enough times and things get quiet on the road, you can move into your rhythm. Until the next time you get back in the car and its anxiety/fear of the unknown skyrockets all over again.  I’ll talk more this week about the 3 things I’m doing every morning to practice taking the critic along for the ride without letting it drive.

Alright, I’ve been eagerly waiting for February to come around, 1 month after all those New Years resolutions, so I could talk about what I’m working on this year and have some experience to back up my new methodology.

Unlike previous years, where my health resolutions usually included cleaning up my diet even further (overdid that one), or starting a new fitness routine, this year I decided to simply maintain my daily movement/whole foods lifestyle and instead focus heavily on the mind.

The interesting part about focusing on the mind is you have to use the mind to improve the mind. So forget mind over matter, it’s mind over mind.

Part of that challenge began with detaching myself just enough to recognize there‘s few minds involved and repeatedly giving the upper hand to the helpful one when the critical one starts its mental slander. I’ll emphasize repeatedly because like anything it’s a practice. In my case, and I suspect I’m not alone, the critical one has been stepping in and talking for most of my life, and it’s not taking a backseat quietly. Especially, when I’ve decided to actively focus my attention on making sure it stays in the backseat.

To lessen the conflict and make this transition a bit smoother, I imagine the critical, fear-based, anxious mind as more of an oversized (cute and lovable) puppy. And in the same way driving around with a puppy that isn’t trained to stay in the backseat while you focus on the road, it will continually try to get your attention and move to the front. As you repeatedly (gently) move it to the back it will whine, tantrum, and try everything - even the endearing gestures - to reclaim its status. But you’re driving now. Thank it for all of the times it’s served you in the past but we’re traveling at different speeds now - and we’re going different places.

Once you ask it to stay in the back enough times and things get quiet on the road, you can move into your rhythm. Until the next time you get back in the car and its anxiety/fear of the unknown skyrockets all over again.

I’ll talk more this week about the 3 things I’m doing every morning to practice taking the critic along for the ride without letting it drive.

Life by Design was born out of a need for my own self-healing after decades of unresolved illness. It wasn’t until finding the courage to look within that I discovered it was my own belief system holding me back from experiencing a truly thriving life. We all have access to that thriving life. We just need to rediscover our power and ignite the healing-self. Only then can we unapologetically live a life by our own design.